F.A.Q

Why Join the Union?

From pay to training to retirement, LIUNA members live better.

  • Men and women working in the construction industry see the difference a union makes in every paycheck.
  • The average wage for a union-represented construction worker is $20.60, compared with $13.30 for a construction worker without a union, according to the Current Population Survey. In some sectors, the advantage is even greater. For example, a heavy-highway LIUNA worker averages $25.47 an hour in wages and benefits, compared to $13.72 for heavy-highway workers not in a union, according to Engineering News Record’s Construction Economics Department.
  • Joining together in a union helps neutralize pay discrimination. The most recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that union construction workers who are women enjoy a 70 percent pay advantage.
  • LIUNA offers some of the best continuing education systems in the world for free. This training, which includes more than 50 different courses, opens the doors to new opportunities by providing members with the skills employers need. Classes are available in every province in Canada.
  • LIUNA helps keep members safer by empowering workers with the ability to speak out about workplace hazards, and by providing training that helps workers recognize potential hazards.
  • When it comes to healthcare and retirement, construction workers with a union have the advantage.
  • According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 82 percent of union construction workers have health insurance compared to only 46 percent of non-union construction workers.
  • The Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration reports that while only 35 percent of non-union construction workers have a pension plan, 77 percent of union construction workers have a pension plan.
  • Public service workers find a strong collective voice through LIUNA, with bargaining rights, better pay and better benefits.
  • More employment opportunities, LiUNA has a large pool of employers which uses its’ members.

 

What about Union Dues?

Union dues are paid to the union from each member. These dues support the local working on the behalf of members on issues of dispute resolution with employers, contract negotiations, benefit and pension administration, collective agreement interpretation and enforcement, and more.  Dues can be paid at the local union offices in cash, check, or bank draft.

 

Out of Work Board

Once laid off, members should call into the union office and request that their name be added to the board.  To maintain your position you must call in once a month to either the job line or the union office.  If you miss a monthly call in your name will be removed from the out of work board and will be placed at the back of the board upon your next call in.

 

Union Hall Rules

At Local 1258, we ask that all of our members adhere to the standards outlined in our Union Hall Rules.

Click here to view Local 1258 Hiring Hall Rules